Upcoming Events

Continuing LCGA's examination of Film and how it represents the changing face of the Worker, curated by Anthony Haughey, and as part of STRIKE! exhibition, a rare opportunity to see the following MODERN TIMES (1936) by Charlie Chaplin occurs on Monday 11 March at 2pm. The screening is followed by a discussion with Artist Mark Curran whose work has included the changing nature of conditions of Work.

Monday 11th March 2013
@ Limerick City Gallery of Art

Continuing LCGA's examination of Film and how it represents the changing face of the Worker, curated by Anthony Haughey, and as part of STRIKE! exhibition, a rare opportunity to see the following MODERN TIMES (1936) by Charlie Chaplin occurs on Monday 11 March at 2pm.

The screening is followed by a discussion with Artist Mark Curran whose work has included the changing nature of conditions of Work.

2.00pm - MODERN TIMES DIRECTED BY CHARLIE CHAPLIN (1936)

Modern Times marked the last screen appearance of the Little Tramp - the character which had brought Charles Chaplin world fame, and remains the most universally recognised fictional image of a human being in the history of art.

The world from which the Tramp took his farewell was very different from that into which he had been born, two decades earlier, before the First World War. Then he had shared and symbolised the hardships of all the underprivileged of a world only just emerging from the 19th century. Modern Timesfound him facing very different predicaments in the aftermath of America¹s Great Depression, when mass unemployment coincided with the massive rise of industrial automation. Chaplin was acutely preoccupied with the social and economic problems of this new age. In 1931 and 1932 he had left Hollywood behind, to embark on an 18-month world tour. In Europe, he had been disturbed to see the rise of nationalism and the social effects of the Depression, of unemployment and of automation. He read books on economic theory; and devised his own Economic Solution, an intelligent exercise in Utopian idealism, based on a more equitable distribution not just of wealth but of work. In 1931 he told a newspaper interviewer “Unemployment is the vital question … Machinery should benefit mankind. It should not spell tragedy and throw it out of work.”

In Modern Times he set out to transform his observations and anxieties into comedy. The little Tramp - described in the film credits as “a Factory Worker”- is now one of the millions coping with the problems of the 1930s, which are not so very different from anxieties of the 21st century - poverty, unemployment, strikes and strike breakers, political intolerance, economic inequalities, the tyranny of the machine, narcotics. The film’s portentous opening title - “The story of industry, of individual enterprise - humanity crusading in the pursuit of happiness” - is followed by a symbolic juxtaposition of shots of sheep being herded and of workers streaming out of a factory. Chaplin’s character is first seen as a worker being driven crazy by his monotonous, inhuman work on a conveyor belt and being used as a guinea pig to test a machine to feed workers as they work.

Screened with the permission of Park Circus Limited on date to be confirmed

3.30pm -discussion with Mark Curran, Artist,

Mark Curran lives and works in Berlin and Dublin. He completed a practice-led PhD through the Dublin Institute of Technology (2011), lectures on the BA Photography programme, Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Dublin and is Visiting Professor on the MA in Visual and Media Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin. Incorporating multi-media installation informed by ethnographic understandings, Curran’s has undertaken a cycle of projects addressing the predatory context of migrations of global capital. These have been extensively presented and published, including Xuhui Art Museum, Shanghai, China (2010), DePaul Art Museum, Chicago, USA (2010), Encontros da Imagem, Braga, Portugal (2011) and PhotoIreland (2012). Work will be included in a forthcoming edition, edited by Liz Wells and Deborah Bright, of the UK Journal, Photographies. Curated by Helen Carey of LCGA, his present multi-sited transnational project, to mark the centenary of the Dublin Lockout 1913, a pivotal moment in Irish labour history, focuses on the functioning of the global stock and commodity markets.

Venue: Limerick City Gallery of Art

Admission: Free

SEED MATTERS by Christine Mackey, Drawings and Photographs from the Permanent Collection and STRIKE! continue until 15 March 2013

 


The Gallery Plan Your Visit Gallery Events Exhibitions The Collection Education Publications Media